Dietary Needs

Plant-based Chef Nina Curtis

Forging a Plant-based Path to Wellness

Once a competitive bodybuilder who believed it took animal protein to build muscle, Nina Curtis found her competitive edge when she “broke up with salmon” and became a vegan chef. While Nina Curtis has been a foodie since she was an eight-year-old helping her mom cook from scratch and lending a hand with her dad’s catering business, she never thought she would cook for a living. “That’s why you should never say never, because it could come back to haunt you,” she says. And, while her mom went organic long before it was a thing, Nina’s early professional food experience…

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Business people eating dinner at private event special diets

Top 10 Ways to Advocate for People with Special Diets

Ensuring a safe meal boils down to the importance of communication and advocating for guests with special diets. Creating and delivering memorable events is the plan. But, if an attendee becomes ill due or food poisoning or a meal being contaminated with listeria, the likelihood of return engagement evaporates. Food safety aside, another way attendees can become ill is by being served a meal unsafe or inappropriate for their health condition. Equally concerning is serving a dish which contradicts a religious belief system or health choice. Food allergies, celiac disease, and diabetes are a few health conditions that require personalized…

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Chestnuts roasting in metal pan on an open fire nut allergy

Chestnuts Roasting on an Open Fire…Are they an Allergen?

The Nat King Cole holiday tune about chestnuts is catchy, but for some of us in the food industry, this song leaves us scratching our heads. Are chestnuts a culinary nut? What about nutmeg? Isn’t it a spice? The world of nuts can be a little nutty (pun intended), confusing, and delicious! Let’s look at a few fun and important facts about these holiday favorites.

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Low GI diet food with blood sugar testing equipment diabetes type 1

Diabetes: Know Your Types

While you may be covering the bases for attendees with Type 2 diabetes already by offering healthy food options, those with the Type 1 form of the disease may need a bit more in the way of accommodations.   Most of us have at least a passing knowledge of the most common form of diabetes, Type 2, in which the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin, or the person has developed insulin resistance. But Type 1, also known as Juvenile-onset diabetes, is generally much less well-known, with the possible exception of those who were fans of the Baby-Sitters Club young-adult series…

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